Through a nonprofit credit-counseling agency, you can work with a counselor to resolve your financial problems on your own, says Bruce McClary, vice president of public relations and external affairs at the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Or you can enter what’s called a debt management plan. Through that plan, you can consolidate your credit card payments and get the cards’ interest rates reduced, making your financial obligations easier to tackle.
When you take a balance transfer, you'll move the balance on an existing credit card that's at a high interest rate over to the card with the 0% promotional rate. From that time on, you'll pay no interest for 12 to 18 months, or whatever the time limit on the promotional rate is. Every dollar you pay toward your debt goes to reducing the principal. You'll repay debt much more quickly when you have no interest to pay. 
Tax man awaits. If you have debt forgiven, that probably will count as taxable income and should be reported on your federal income taxes. The lender who forgives the debt should send you a 1099-C tax form detailing how much the original debt was and how much was forgiven. For example, if you owed $25,000 and had $10,000 forgiven, you would have to claim the $10,000 as income on your taxes.
If you’re not sure where to start, track your spending for at least a day to see if you’re getting enough value from the things you buy. Just write it down as you spend and see how you feel. You’ll probably be amazed that you begin making changes immediately, cutting out the things that don’t really matter to you and getting more of the things that do instead.

But debt consolidation is not for everyone. If you have a lot of debt, you may not be able to secure the low debt consolidation rates that this approach depends on. And consolidating debt doesn't necessarily help you reduce it — consumers taking out consolidation loans often find their debt remains the same or actually increases over a period of a couple years. Your ACCC credit counselor can help you decide if debt consolidation makes sense for you.


Having said that, the fees for our services vary by state and the amount of your debt. The fee varies between 18-25% of your enrolled debt. Compared to the $1000s in interest you will pay on your credit cards while you struggle to pay them off, you can see that this fee is quite reasonable. Especially when you take into account the fact that you can become debt free in 24-48 months with our debt consolidation program.
If you have unsecured debts that qualify for a debt management plan and secured debts that don’t qualify, a debt management plan can still work. When you sign up for a debt management plan with a nonprofit agency, the credit counselor assigned to your case will offer comprehensive financial advice that can help you pay down all your debts — not just debts governed by your debt management plan.

Participating in a credit counseling session will not be reflected on your credit report and it will not impact your credit score. However, changes in your financial behavior, especially after choosing a debt solution, may have a positive or negative impact on your score. For example, joining a debt management program and having your credit cards closed may initially lower your score. But making on-time payments you can afford over time, could raise your score. A study published by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling found that participants saw a 50 point average increase in their credit scores, 18 months after finishing the service. This gain applied to those in the bottom quartile of credit score.
Most reputable credit counselors are non-profit and offer services at local offices, online, or on the phone. If possible, find an organization that offers in-person counseling. Many universities, military bases, credit unions, housing authorities, and branches of the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service operate non-profit credit counseling programs. Your financial institution, local consumer protection agency, and friends and family also may be good sources of information and referrals.

As a debt junkie for almost ten years, I ran up credit card after credit card living like my salary was about four times its actual size. Stupid things I bought on credit included flying lessons, weekends in Las Vegas, and a brand new pickup truck. Hey, I never said I wasn’t having fun. (Remember, I’m on the other side of 25 now, so I started college pre-recession… during the dot-com boom. Back then, I actually thought I could graduate with a sociology major and find a $75k a year job—because I knew people who did!)
If you’re not sure where to start, track your spending for at least a day to see if you’re getting enough value from the things you buy. Just write it down as you spend and see how you feel. You’ll probably be amazed that you begin making changes immediately, cutting out the things that don’t really matter to you and getting more of the things that do instead.
Bankruptcy. Declaring bankruptcy has serious consequences, including lowering your credit score, but credit counselors and other experts say that in some cases, it may make the most sense. Filing for bankruptcy under Chapter 13 allows people with a steady income to keep property, like a mortgaged house or a car, that they might otherwise lose through the Chapter 7 bankruptcy process. In Chapter 13, the court approves a repayment plan that allows you to pay off your debts over a three to five year period, without surrendering any property. After you have made all the payments under the plan, your debts are discharged. As part of the Chapter 13 process, you will have to pay a lawyer, and you must get credit counseling from a government-approved organization within six months before you file for any bankruptcy relief.
As far as options go, I’d recommend you start by talking with a reputable credit counseling agency – one of the options I mentioned in the story. That will give you a baseline to start with. If they can help you with DMP, it’s likely to do the least damage to your credit (with the exception of just paying the debt off) over the long run. If you/they determine a DMP isn’t feasible then you’ll know you have to look at more drastic options like negotiation or bankruptcy.
Military credit and debt counseling is offered to active service members as part of the Military OneSource Program. The federal government created this program in partnership with non-profits such as the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Any member of the military, whether active duty or a reserve, may qualify for free advice and counseling. Clients can have a number of financial issues addressed, including excessive credit card or medical debts, sign up for budgeting workshops, credit repair and more. Read Military OneSource Program.
Also, there are many not for profit credit counseling organizations who offer services at local offices, online, and on the phone. Many universities, military bases, credit unions, housing authorities, and branches of the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service operate nonprofit credit counseling programs. Local financial institutions and consumer protection agencies may also be good sources of information and referrals.

Bankruptcy stays on your credit report for a decade, it costs money, and it's emotionally difficult. It's a last resort -- but it is an option you should often turn to before liquidating retirement savings (which is protected during bankruptcy) or before struggling for years to make payments on debt that doesn't go down because all the money goes to interest. 


I graduated college in 2014, spent a year in law school before realizing it wasn’t for me. Although I have a good paying job now, I didn’t realize how expensive law school really was! My credit card debt for networking and socializing was drastically higher than it was for undergrad (where I paid it off every month). I’m now confronted with this and working to pay it down (3 months in and $2,000 down!). But I’m trying to get even more so that I can start saving for a ring! I didn’t sell any of my textbooks back in college and posted them online last week. So far I’ve earned almost $600 off of them, all of which is going towards my credit card. Additionally, my security deposit from my old apartment is coming back. I don’t have my entire emergency fund built yet (about 1.5 months worth saved), so 1/3 of it is going towards that, the other 2/3 towards my debt. I should be able to pay off another $2,000 in the second half of August/first half of September.
I have been with NDR almost a full year and am happy with my results. They have settled 3 of my 5 accounts so far and I have received letters from these companies saying what the settlement was for. Also about the credit situation, they tell you when you sign up that it is a negative impact on your credit, you would have to be stupid to think your credit is going to be fine when you're settling with one of your creditors for half the price they lent you. NDR in my books on a scale of 1-10 is a perfect 10, I'm very satisfied with my results and glad I've found someone that is willing to help people that are sinking in debt
Afterward, a National Debt Relief specialist will contact you to discuss options and require that you provide proof of your debt balance, income, assets and basic necessity expenses. Any proof that you are struggling with financial hardship needs to be provided during the initial financial review to assess whether a debt settlement program is right for you.
A credit counselor is a professional who can advise you on how to handle and successfully pay off your debt. A simple call to a credit counseling agency for a consultation won’t impact your credit in the slightest. But if the credit counselor or agency enrolls you in any kind of consolidation, repayment, or management plan, that could affect your credit.
Shady. I have to work with these ” yahoos” daily as I am a debt collector. They will not accept the guidelines set by the creditors to provide settlement options to their clients. They INSIST that I take very low and unreasonable offers to creditors and even if I manage to get them approved then say THEY have to get them approved before paying out. I feel if you are making an offer to settle, it is only fair that you can fund the settlement instead of jerking around. It’s a waste of everyone’s time and is unethical. You can’t make offers to creditors that you can’t fund!
People are creatures of habits and spending money is no exception. We shop at the same stores, eat in the same restaurants and drive the same car, because it’s comfortable. It’s also costing you more than you can handle financially. Remedy: If you won’t change your spending habits, you won’t ever get out of debt. Start with your morning habits (have your coffee and breakfast at home). Go to lunch with a brown bag, not a wallet. In the evening, watch games or movies on TV, while eating a home cooked meal. You will see an immediate impact on your daily spending habits. You don’t have to do without. You just have to make better choices with what you do.

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To answer your question, though, how defaulting on season tickets would impact your credit would depend on whether or not the organization/team reports the incident/account to the credit reporting agencies. If they report the incident as a collection it will have a negative impact on credit standing and hurt your credit score. It won’t impact current accounts but if the impact is significant and your credit score takes a severe hit, it could impact future loans, their interest rates and your ability to qualify for them.
To answer the question in a word, no. This company is one of a handful of U.S. debt-relief providers that has spearheaded innovative strategies to achieve freedom from the crippling impact of credit card debt. More to the point this company not only embraces an ethical model of debt-relief, it is helping to establish accredited standards for the rest of the industry. As far as debt-settlement goes I would rank this service well above most other debt-management type programs that essentially work in unison with credit card companies to recover the maximum debt. Credit counseling is debt-collection under the guide of debt-relief and play on consumer's anxieties and mistrust. There is no Rosetta Stone for the language of debt settlement, so until such time I recommend going with a pro service. From my own experience I can say that this company has a dedicated negotiations team who handles every aspect of the settlement process. In my initial consultation, I observed that they follow rather strict underwriting guidelines in approving candidate for their programs. Since this company doesn't collect it's service fee until after a settlement with a creditor has been secured and verified, they will not approve clients with too little/too much income or debts that may pose difficulty in settling (back taxes, mortgages, secured loans, child support owed). What I really like is that National Debt Relief fully discloses any risks attached to debt consolidation and does business with clients in complete transparency and reciprocity. They don't hide the fact that they are for-profit and benefit as your debt amount progressively decreases! There must be hundreds of companies and even more individuals who have branded debt relief programs or self-styled systems of paying of your credit card debt. Even if someone is asking you for $1 upfront for a CD or DVD, that is a clear sign of a scam. This company is not providing some exhaustible product but a committed service and it shows in its rankings/accreditations (BBB/AFCC)!!!
Nearly 50% of all college graduates leave school with private or federal loans, and the average US student leaves with at least $10,000 to repay. This can be a substantial burden for recent graduates, which makes student loan consolidation a smart - and sometimes necessary - choice for any graduate in need of debt help. Consolidation of federal loans is easy, and might save you hundreds of dollars by lowering your interest rate. Read our guide to federal and private student loans, browse our articles on the topic.

When it comes to paying off credit card debt, many consumers take the path of least resistance: the so-called "minimum payment plan." By law, credit card issuers are required to set a minimum monthly payment amount for each cardholder. These payments are calculated on the basis of the cardholder's total balance, interest rate and certain other factors.


It depends on how much debt you have and how successful National Debt Relief is in negotiating with your creditors. However, there are quite a few examples of how much past customers have saved in reviews on the Better Business Bureau (BBB) website. One customer claimed enrolling in the program helped them cut down their payments by almost 70%, while another said they were able to shave two years and $3,000 off their debt repayments.
No guarantees. Lenders usually want to work with you, but they can choose not to. This is especially true with debt settlement. You may contribute to the fund used to make a settlement offer for 6-8 months and then find out the lender won’t accept the offer. If you choose this route, be sure to get a written agreement from the lender that they will work with you.

Report any problems you have with a debt collection company to your State Attorney General's Office, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Many states have their own debt collection laws that are different from the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Your state Attorney General’s office can help you find out your rights under your state’s law.

Premier Debt Help is a company that has helped thousands of customers find effective, affordable, and highly beneficial debt settlement. When you sign up for debt relief with Premier, you get knowledge, experience, and personalized debt relief help for you. We take pride in offering a program that offers rapid debt relief, allows families to pay off debt for a fraction of what they owe, and also helps educate families on their personal finances. If you feel lost, don’t wait until it’s too late. Give us a call, and let our program help you get back on your feet.
Another option is consolidating your debts into one manageable account. The main purpose of this is to eliminate the higher interest rate debts, arrive at lower monthly payments and allow you to concentrate on making just one payment. However, this does nothing to your total balance. What you will be doing is shifting all of your debts into just one account.

National Debt Relief is a debt settlement service. For a fee, it will negotiate with your creditors to reduce the amount of debt you owe. It’s among the most recognized debt settlement services in the country, with high rankings from the BBB and Trustpilot reviewers. It’s also accredited with top industry associations, including the American Fair Credit Council (AFCC).
A debt-settlement firm is typically a private company that works to settle your debt with a creditor. They may charge fees upfront and promise to help you pay off debt. Beware of debt settlement companies, and if you’re unsure of the difference between a debt settlement company and credit counselor, review this chart by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
Under a DMP plan, the consumer deposits money each month into an account within the credit counseling organization. The organization then uses the funds to pay the unsecured debt, such as credit card bills, student loans, and medical bills. Paying off of debt follows a payment schedule the counselor and consumer develops. Often creditors will need to agree to the scheduled repayment plan. Creditors may decide to lower interest rates or waive fees. A successful DMP requires regular, timely payments. It may take 48 months or more to complete a debt management plan.
Personal loans:Personal loans are for a fixed amount of money from banks, credit unions, and online sources. Average personal loan rates range from 10% to 28%, depending on credit. When rates are very high, early and aggressive debt payoff is important. If rates are reasonable, you may wish to prioritize other money goals before putting extra money toward repaying early. 
Don’t refinance Federal loans unless you are very comfortable with your ability to repay. Think hard about the chances you won’t be able to make payments for a few months. Once you refinance student loans, you may lose flexible Federal payment options that can help you if you genuinely can’t afford the payments you have today. Check the Federal loan repayment estimator to make sure you see all the Federal options you have right now.
I’m in this program, can you tell me the dates they gave you that everything would be paid, was your accts pain in full an over with. I’m also needing to know did you get new contracts to sign about your first payment an balances, I’ve got one twice an I feel like if I sign it they’re saying I’m starting all over again, I see my balances going down I’m just confused with this. can you give me any advise, I contacted a lawyer an was told these companies are not legit, I’m just lost at this point not sure what to do lawyers advise was to file bankrupt, don’t want that…..Thanks
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