If you have loads of debt but are current on all your payments, your credit score may drop when you enroll in debt management. That’s because as your debt management company renegotiates your credit obligations, they may change when payments are made to creditors, resulting in late payments being reported on your credit history. Additionally, many creditors will close your accounts while you are in debt management, and good history you have with those accounts will be taken off your credit history.

Nearly 50% of all college graduates leave school with private or federal loans, and the average US student leaves with at least $10,000 to repay. This can be a substantial burden for recent graduates, which makes student loan consolidation a smart - and sometimes necessary - choice for any graduate in need of debt help. Consolidation of federal loans is easy, and might save you hundreds of dollars by lowering your interest rate. Read our guide to federal and private student loans, browse our articles on the topic.
The debt management plan consolidates your debt into a single payment. Each payday, you automatically deposit money into your GreenPath account, and we use that money to pay on your behalf. We may be able to arrange lower interest rates and monthly payments with your creditors, so you can pay off debt faster and save money. Once creditors agree to the program, collection calls stop and you see your balances start to go down.
Under the provisions of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), you may qualify for a reduced interest rate on mortgage payments or credit card debt, protection from eviction, or a delay of all civil court actions, such as bankruptcy, foreclosure, or divorce proceedings. To find out if you qualify, contact your local Armed Forces Legal Assistance office.

Debt settlement companies also charge a fee for their "service." Most of the time, settlement fees cost between $1,500 to $3,500. Fraudulent debt settlement companies often tell customers to stop making payments on their debts and instead pay the company. Once their fee is accounted for, they promise to negotiate with your creditors and settle your debts. Sounds great, right? Well, the debt settlement companies usually don’t deliver on helping you with your debt after they take your money. They’ll leave you on the hook for late fees and additional interest payments on debt they promised to help you pay!


Over time, bankruptcy might come back to bite you in unexpected ways. If your employer requires you to carry a security clearance, there's a chance that it could be rescinded. If you're applying for a mortgage or rental property, your brush with insolvency could disqualify you from consideration. Depending on your area of expertise, you might even find it difficult to find or keep a job.
Tip: Before you do business with any debt settlement company, contact your state Attorney General and local consumer protection agency . They can tell you if any consumer complaints are on file about the firm you're considering doing business with. Some states require debt settlement companies to be licensed. You can check with your state regulator or ask your state Attorney General if the company is required to be licensed to work in your state and, if so, whether it is. You can also view the Federal Trade Commission's page on "Coping with Debt " for more information.
DISCLAIMER - Debt.com does not provide direct debt adjustment services, but, upon request, acts as a locator service for BBB registered companies. It is ultimately up to you to determine whether the companies that we may introduce you to are appropriate for your situation. For debt consolidation programs, where permissible by law, companies may charge a one-time enrollment fee typically from $25 up to $75 for account establishment and for debt relief proposals submitted on your behalf to each of your creditors. Monthly program administration fees will vary from $5 but no greater than $75 depending on your state of residence and/or the number of creditors who agree to accept proposals and become enrolled in the program. Fees subject to change if permissible by law. For debt settlement programs, by law, you may not be charged any fee until a debt settlement is arranged on your behalf, you approve the settlement, and at least one payment is made towards the settlement. Each program offered by independent financial service providers is unique so ask them for their complete details of the program and fees.

As a debt junkie for almost ten years, I ran up credit card after credit card living like my salary was about four times its actual size. Stupid things I bought on credit included flying lessons, weekends in Las Vegas, and a brand new pickup truck. Hey, I never said I wasn’t having fun. (Remember, I’m on the other side of 25 now, so I started college pre-recession… during the dot-com boom. Back then, I actually thought I could graduate with a sociology major and find a $75k a year job—because I knew people who did!)
I think I made a HUGE mistake with this company. I signed both my mother, who had a stroke and I take care of, and myself with NDR. Our creditors were getting paid monthly and on time. Now we are stacking up late fees and overlimit fees on a monthly basis. I feel none of our creditors are going to get anything for at least six months or more. Our phones ring non-stop from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Also NDR is charging fees each month against our deposits. Credit wasn't the greatest due to the large amount of credit cards, but at least they got money every month. Credit score is totally in the toilet now.

InCharge Debt Solutions boasts one of the most polished websites of the companies I evaluated. The company’s debt management FAQs and financial education resources are very thorough. They are clear about fees ($50 to enroll and $49 monthly). They are also among the few companies that give you an idea of how much your interest rates might drop under a debt management plan (6% to 9%). InCharge is accredited by the BBB with A+ rating; other certifications include the NFCC and COA.
I have been with National Debt Relief Service and thought I would save 40% to 50% of my debt. but, so far, with 23% customer fees among others, the 7 I have settled for $7333.64 out of $10,388 with their fees came to a net savings of less than $3055. The fees are very high and now that I am signed up, I cannot leave since they say the creditors would not honor the settlement amounts.
Debt management plans, or DMPs, will lower your interest rates and therefore monthly payments. These so called DMPs are available directly from a credit card issuer, lawyer, debt management company or a non-profit credit counseling agency. The company that you enter into a plan with will negotiate on your behalf with your creditors. This can help you get lower interest rates, waive fees, provide you additional time, and will reduce the total amount of your monthly payments. More on debt management plans.
There are two ways to file for bankruptcy – a chapter 7 and a chapter 13. The difference is that a chapter 7 bankruptcy is called a liquidation bankruptcy as its goal is to liquidate your assets to repay your creditors. However, much of your assets such as your house, automobile, furniture and personal items are excluded in a chapter 7 bankruptcy so in practice you might not have any assets that could be liquidated.

There are big benefits to this approach. You don't have to go through an approval process -- the amount you can borrow is determined by your policy's value. You can use the money to repay any debt you want, because there's no explanation required for what you plan to do with it. And while you need to pay back the policy with interest, you're borrowing from yourself so you aren't fattening the pockets of a creditor. Furthermore, there's typically no mandatory minimum monthly payment, and interest rates are low. 


It depends on how much debt you have and how successful National Debt Relief is in negotiating with your creditors. However, there are quite a few examples of how much past customers have saved in reviews on the Better Business Bureau (BBB) website. One customer claimed enrolling in the program helped them cut down their payments by almost 70%, while another said they were able to shave two years and $3,000 off their debt repayments.
I was referred to Premier by a family member. During my free consultation I no longer felt bad about my finances, Rikki made me feel better about taking the steps needed to move forward and that I was not alone. You don’t realize how many people are struggling or have struggled until you reach out for help. Thank you so much for helping me get back on track!
People who eliminate debt often fall back into debt because they don’t change their spending habits. If you don’t change the underlying reason that you accumulated significant debt, then you will probably become indebted and need debt relief help again in the future. National Debt Relief provides educational services to help you avoid this situation. If you want to remain debt-free, you need to take seriously the debt education services National Debt Relief offers.

Under the provisions of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), you may qualify for a reduced interest rate on mortgage payments or credit card debt, protection from eviction, or a delay of all civil court actions, such as bankruptcy, foreclosure, or divorce proceedings. To find out if you qualify, contact your local Armed Forces Legal Assistance office.
If you want some early small victories, some people recommend the “snowball” method, where you pay minimums on the largest bills while you work at paying them off, smallest to largest. Once the smallest one is paid off, you put the money you had been paying toward the next-smallest and so on. Another way is to pay the highest-interest-rate balance first. Use the one that makes the most sense to you. Read more here: 5 Ways To Get Out of Debt: Which Will Work for You?
I have been with NDR almost a full year and am happy with my results. They have settled 3 of my 5 accounts so far and I have received letters from these companies saying what the settlement was for. Also about the credit situation, they tell you when you sign up that it is a negative impact on your credit, you would have to be stupid to think your credit is going to be fine when you're settling with one of your creditors for half the price they lent you. NDR in my books on a scale of 1-10 is a perfect 10, I'm very satisfied with my results and glad I've found someone that is willing to help people that are sinking in debt
Before discussing anything else, we’d like you to know that you have the option to fix everything yourself. Unfortunately success is not guaranteed as you have proven that you haven’t been able to manage your finances. But it could be worth a try. The good thing is that you will not be burdened with the additional costs of hiring someone to help you out. You will be able to concentrate all your funds on paying off your debts.
You may want to set net worth goals, too. Getting to a positive net worth might be an initial goal, and you might also set a series of savings goals for arriving at what you need for retirement. First, though, you'll need to have your debt under control -- and, ideally, wiped out. Keep these goals handy and regularly reflect on them to assess whether you're making progress, and what behaviors are hindering your success. 

Chapter 13 is a three- or five-year court-approved repayment plan, based on your income and debts. If you are able to stick with the plan for its full term, the remaining unsecured debt is discharged. It will take longer than a Chapter 7 — but if you are able to keep up with payments (a majority of people are not), you will get to keep your property. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy stays on your credit report for seven years from the filing date.
If debt management doesn’t seem quite right for your situation, there are several other debt relief options. I start with the least drastic option, credit counseling, and end with what most may agree is the most drastic: bankruptcy. Of course, all of these methods have their own pros and cons, and only you can decide whether they are better or worse for your situation.
For most people I would say that signing up for National Debt Relief is not a good idea. While on its face, having you pay no up front fees with the goal of making you debt free in 2 to 4 years sounds great.  However the truth is there may be better options which can accomplish the same goals for a lower cost and that have less of an impact on your credit and your sanity from being sued by a debt collector.  Debt settlement in my opinion is best suited for people who have already been delinquent with their debts and have lump sums to offer up front to negotiate settlements of 50% or less in many cases.  Otherwise chapter 7 bankruptcy or chapter 13 bankruptcy may be the best fit to eliminate debt or pay off debt over a 3 to 5 year repayment plan and avoid being sued by a lawsuit.
Whenever you are dealing with a company that deals with debt or even money, people tend to have strong opinions. When you are dealing with risky procedures like debt settlement and bankruptcy, those opinions get even stronger. Generally, National Debt Relief reviews are good among debt relief services and it is one of the most trusted of the debt relief program services out there. On the flip side, there are a lot of people out there who feel scammed by National Debt Relief. Part of that is people who didn’t understand the risks involved. Part of it is people who didn’t get the results they were looking for. And part of it is probably National Debt Relief’s fault.

Bill “No Pay” Fay has lived a meager financial existence his entire life. He started writing/bragging about it seven years ago, helping birth Debt.org into existence as the site’s original “Frugal Man.” Prior to that, he spent more than 30 years covering college and professional sports, which are the fantasy worlds of finance. His work has been published by the Associated Press, New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Sports Illustrated and Sporting News, among others. His interest in sports has waned some, but his interest in never reaching for his wallet is as passionate as ever. Bill can be reached at bfay@debt.org.
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