However, there are impacts to your credit that don’t affect your score. While on a Debt Management Plan, a client’s credit report will have a notation that he or she is currently enrolled in a Debt Management Plan. While that notation is active, they will not be granted new credit. Plainly, this is an impact to one’s credit that should be considered. But the notation goes away when the Debt Management Plan is complete, and doesn’t have a lasting impact on one’s credit.
A debt settlement plan in which you repay less than you owe hurts your credit. If your score is around 680 at the time you settle your debt, you could lose between 45 and 65 points. If your score was around 780, you'd lose between 140 and 160 points. However, it won't hurt your score as much as bankruptcy. For a 680 score, bankruptcy could take off 130 to 150 points, and for a 780 score, bankruptcy would cause a drop between 220 and 240 points. While the drop to your score is dramatic and it could take several years to recover, debt settlement could provide much-needed relief if you're struggling to pay bills. 
If you're interested in starting a debt management plan, you'll first need to find a credit counselor. The Federal Trade Commission recommends you never agree to any debt management plan until a reputable credit counselor has thoroughly reviewed your financial situation with you. The U.S. Department of Justice maintains a state-by-state list of approved credit counseling agencies, so you can search for someone near you.
You could consolidate your debts by getting a loan from a bank, credit union or some other source of funds. If you own your home and have some equity you could most probably get a home equity loan or homeowner equity line of credit (HELOC) and use the funds to pay off all of your other debts. These are called secured loans because you’re required to secure them by using the equity in your home as collateral. In fact, home equity loans are often called second mortgages. Whichever you choose you should end up with a much lower monthly payment than the sum of the payments you been making.
Gerri. I screwed up bad. I joined up with a friend who said he can get a company going. I bought $13,000 worth of merchandice and loaned him through time about $15,000 in cash Through cash advanced from my cards. He bailed. I got about $4000 in tools back but I had previous balances(that were controlled) I ended up getting a consolidated loan. Big mistake. Total I owe $13,000($320 month)on a card and $34,000($806 month) to consolidated loan. Now I’m thinking of debt relief($906 per month){total of $34,000which is lower than what I owe on the two debts} My score is 750 est and I don’t want to hurt that. I have house payment of $540 (pay off est $74,000) Car at $450 (pay off approx $15,000)one at $300(pay off approx $13,000) and one at $325 (pay off $23,000{bran new}) and basic stuff. Food, power bill, cable, insurance & cell phones that total up to approx $1300 month. My wife takes care of all that but the mistake of the two debts is all mine. I give her 80% of the pay and I take 20%. I average take home about $2500 to $3000 est every two weeks. I think I need a counselor. What should I do? I’m freaking cause I started the debt relief program($34,000 at $906 for 38 months which is lower than what I owe total on the two debts I’m discussing). but haven’t signed the final paper just yet. I feel I make enough to pay off everything in no time but my wife says we are living paycheck to paycheck. All my wife’s cards will be paid off probably in March. I’m like way confused

You must be able to demonstrate financial hardship, so that the company can negotiate with your creditors and show you are eligible for debt relief. Some examples of financial hardships, according to the company’s website, are a recent job loss, a separation or divorce which has led to a reduction in income, death of a spouse, unexpected medical bills, student loans or IRS taxes.
In addition I had inform them that I was closing the checking account that they had been taking the payments from so they were not to charge that account going forward. That I wouod get back to them with the new information for my new checking account. I purposely had not given them the information because I was researching what my recourse was so when it came time for the payment I hadn’t given the information and on their website it’s it’s showing that I owe them money for fees and they wanted their money so what did they do they charged my old account which had nothing in it so I was hit with a NSF fees and every 3 days I get charged a fee for the negative balance but they got their payment and I’ve got payment it went to fees for the accounts that they lost the settlement because couldn’t make payments to my creditors Beach they had drained my account for all the fees

Balance-transfer cards can help when trying to pay off credit card debt, because you can transfer thousands of dollars owed to a new card that offers a very low initial interest rate -- often 0%. That interest rate will be in effect for between six and 21 months, after which a more standard interest rate will apply. That standard rate will not necessarily be a great one, so you should seek cards that will charge you relatively low interest rate ranges following your teaser-rate period. Your credit score is likely to influence the interest rate you're given after the 0% rate expires, so this is another reason to get your score as high as you can.
But having this mini-emergency fund before devoting extra to your debt is vital to breaking the debt cycle. If you don't have some savings, you might find yourself trapped in a cycle you can never escape. You'll start paying off debt, and then your car breaks down, and you'll end up right back where you started with the same level of debt or more. This is discouraging, can cause you to get off track on repayment, and can make it impossible to ever make real progress.
Chapter 13: Yes. Chapter 13 also discharges debts, but many of the nondischargeable debts like recent taxes and past due child support must be paid in full in the Chapter 13 plan. Unsecured debt like credit cards will only be paid in a Chapter 13 plan if you have the income to cover it. Sometimes unsecured creditors receive a portion of their debt and sometimes they receive nothing at all. But even if they’re not paid they’ll be discharged if you complete your plan. To see how this works, visit Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Basics. 
DebtHelp.com is the one site and the one solution for all of your debt consolidation needs. Let our staff of financial experts, innovative technology and collection of helpful articles assist you in finding your debt solutions. By providing simple and secure quotes for nearly a dozen different debt products, we help our customers to rid themselves of debt quickly and easily.
Many have heard of the tremendous benefits of compounding interest regarding investments before. However, when related to debt, compounding interest works against you as interest builds upon growing outstanding balances. This means that the longer you hold higher-interest debt, the harder it is for you to get out of debt. A higher-interest debt will cost you much more over time and should be your highest priority in paying off. Typically, credit card debts and personal or small business loans will have the highest interest rates.
Debt management and debt settlement are two very different repayment options. A debt management plan provides regular monthly payments to your creditors. In contrast, a debt settlement program often encourages you to stop sending payments to creditors, which can result in serious consequences. The risks associated with debt settlement programs are important to understand. Below is a summary of things you should consider before choosing debt settlement as an option.
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Rates can vary depending on where you live: The rate that is advertised on LendKey is the lowest possible rate among all of its lenders, and some of these lenders are only available to residents of specific areas. So even if you have an excellent credit report, there is still a possibility that you will not receive the lowest rate, depending on geographic location.

There are two ways to file for bankruptcy – a chapter 7 and a chapter 13. The difference is that a chapter 7 bankruptcy is called a liquidation bankruptcy as its goal is to liquidate your assets to repay your creditors. However, much of your assets such as your house, automobile, furniture and personal items are excluded in a chapter 7 bankruptcy so in practice you might not have any assets that could be liquidated.
Our debt counselors must complete intensive financial counseling and become certified by the NFCC. Besides being certified, many of InCharge’s credit counselors have over 10 years of experience as a financial counselor. They’ve helped people through every kind of financial downturn, from losing a loved one to catastrophic illness, to job loss. They can help you too.
Consolidate with a home equity loan. If your total debt load, including credit card, medical, and other unsecured borrowing seem insurmountable for you to pay off, then you can use a home equity loan to consolidate and even pay off these bills. While there are some potentially major risks if you do not do this correctly, the approach is an option. A home equity loan can help you eliminate your higher interest, unsecured debt and improve your financial situation.
Credit counseling organizations are usually non-profit organizations. Typically, their counselors are certified and trained in the areas of consumer credit, money and debt management, and budgeting. Counselors discuss your financial situation with you and help you develop a personalized plan to solve your money problems.  Here are some examples of what credit counselors might do: 
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