A debt management plan (DMP) is an agreement between a debtor and a creditor that addresses the terms of an outstanding debt.[1] This commonly refers to a personal finance process of individuals addressing high consumer debt. Debt management plans help reduce outstanding, unsecured debts over time to help the debtor regain control of finances. The process can secure a lower overall interest rate, longer repayment terms, or an overall reduction in the debt itself.[2]
In addition to using the free services from a non-profit, or working with the lender, there are steps that you can take yourself that can help you reduce your debt. It often combines budgeting as well as working out a solution with the lender. Some of those assistance programs range from payment plans to interest rate reductions or forbearance. It is also important for families to know the difference between bad debt and good debt, so when someone should borrow money or not. The fact is that families, no matter their income, need all the assistance they can get in order to become debt free and pay outstanding bills.

Get the answers to the most common questions on credit card bill and debt consolidation. This can be one solution to use, especially when the interest rates are lower. The process can help you decide whether taking the approach of credit card consolidation is right for you as just maybe it can help you in your personal and financial situation. Find a list of questions about credit card consolidation.
Advantage Credit Counseling Service (CCS) is a Non-Profit Credit Counseling agency that educates consumers about debt management, bankruptcy, and how to properly manage credit. We’ve been helping people take control of their finances since 1968. As a 501(c)3 organization, our agency provides professional, meaningful and confidential consumer education, credit counseling, and develops effective debt reduction programs. We are specialists in teaching individuals about wise money management and the responsible use of credit.

Some companies make use of unethical practices in order to quickly boost a person's credit score. For instance, some companies will instruct people to dispute all debt on their credit report, even accounts they know are legitimate. Since debts are removed while credit bureaus investigate, this can provide a temporary boost in a person's credit score but no long-term benefit. Some state laws, such as the Michigan Credit Services Protection Act, make this practice illegal as well.


Consider debt consolidation. A debt consolidation loan allows you to compile multiple high-interest debts, like credit card balances, into a single lower-interest debt. While debt consolidation can't lower the principal of what you owe, it can reduce the total amount of interest you'll pay over the life of the debt. Reducing interest expenses may make it easier for you to put more money toward paying down the principal of the debt.
Discipline yourself to make regular payments on your debts, prioritizing your smallest debt to make early wins in eliminating debts. Automate those debt payments, so it doesn’t just rely on discipline. Discipline will fail you sooner or later, so the more you can automate “good financial behaviors” like paying down debts and saving money, the more likely you are to sustain them.
The most important first step to getting out of debt is to create a budget and take a hard look at your spending. This can be eye-opening for people who have never tracked their expenses. You have to get serious about reducing or eliminating certain unnecessary expenses. Be prepared to make sacrifices. This might mean a zero-dollar budget for things like date nights and new gadgets. Steer clear of temptations as much as possible, which might involve avoiding the mall or unsubscribing to emails from your favorite online retailer.

While some private companies offer this service to borrowers, many lawyers and debt settlement attorneys may also be able to help you through this process. They help borrowers reduce or eliminate their debts and will work directly with your creditors, including banks. Many of these attorneys work on a contingency basis, meaning you need to pay them only if they are successful and save you money. Learn more about attorneys that settle debts.


Find out if there's a penalty APR, too. That's when the card company jacks your interest rate up to 25% or even 30% if you pay a bill late or commit some other transgression. Many cards don't feature them, and that's preferable. Remember that any time you apply for a new credit card, even for a balance transfer, your credit score may be affected negatively as a result.
Help from debt collectors is available. Find how to get help from debt collectors and learn how to stop collection calls. Families being impacted by this can also receive other assistance, whether free legal aid or counseling. Many government laws and regulations can also help protect you from aggressive collection tactics. They are intended to asisst the everyday consumer. Find how to get help from debt collectors.
There are several steps you can take yourself to repair your credit scores, even if they are very low. Having a higher credit rating can lower the amount of interest you need to pay on your debts, it allows you to get approved to borrow money and improves the ability to take out more loans, such as an auto or mortgage. There are also other benefits. For example, a better credit score can even help you land a job. Find how to repair credit scores.
This is a very important first step before trying to start retiring debt. Having an emergency fund will help keep you from getting deeper into debt when unexpected events happen. If, for example, you have $1,000 in cash set aside and your car or house needs a sudden repair, you do not have to put that repair on a credit card. Ideally, you will want to get to the point where you have an emergency fund worth three to six months of expenses so you can support yourself temporarily if you suddenly lose your job, but the $1,000 is a great start.
Negotiate credit card debt as well as outstanding loans - While it is possible to contact a credit card card company and negotiate yourself, unfortunately getting the best deal you want or that you may need won't necessarily be easy, if it can be done at all. If you do try to negotiate yourself rather than using a professional counselor, find a do it yourself approach to negotiate and get out of debt.

You may want to set net worth goals, too. Getting to a positive net worth might be an initial goal, and you might also set a series of savings goals for arriving at what you need for retirement. First, though, you'll need to have your debt under control -- and, ideally, wiped out. Keep these goals handy and regularly reflect on them to assess whether you're making progress, and what behaviors are hindering your success. 
Find free, simple steps to take in order eliminate credit card debt and to save money on all of your monthly bills. Experts offer free, do it yourself advice and simple steps that you can take yourself to eliminate credit card debt. The goal of these methods is to help you become debt free in a fairly short time frame. While there is no easy button to press, taking some small steps now can put you on the right path. Many are tried and true. There are steps to follow to eliminate credit card debt, as it does take time.

You could consolidate your debts by getting a loan from a bank, credit union or some other source of funds. If you own your home and have some equity you could most probably get a home equity loan or homeowner equity line of credit (HELOC) and use the funds to pay off all of your other debts. These are called secured loans because you’re required to secure them by using the equity in your home as collateral. In fact, home equity loans are often called second mortgages. Whichever you choose you should end up with a much lower monthly payment than the sum of the payments you been making.
Debt settlement companies typically ask you to stop paying your creditors and instead put the money in an account they control. Each creditor is approached as the money accumulates in your account and you fall further and further behind on payments. Fear of getting nothing at all may motivate the creditor to accept a smaller lump-sum offer and agree not to pursue you for the rest.
Credit limitation: Like a balance transfer, a personal debt consolidation loan is usually only a viable solution for consumers who have a good credit score. The higher you score, the lower the interest rate you can qualify for on the loan. APR of 5% is ideal, but anything below 10% may be enough to provide the relief you need. If you can’t qualify for a rate below 10%, look for other options.
I was referred to Premier by a family member. During my free consultation I no longer felt bad about my finances, Rikki made me feel better about taking the steps needed to move forward and that I was not alone. You don’t realize how many people are struggling or have struggled until you reach out for help. Thank you so much for helping me get back on track!
Learn about other types of assistance programs from credit card companies. While it is true that many are increasing fees and in general turning up the pressure on credit card holders, there are also an increasing number of companies that are creating assistance programs to take a more pro-active approach in an effort to truly help people. They are more willing to reduce and cancel unpaid debt, reduce interest rates, allow payment plans, and offer other assistance.
On the opposite end of the spectrum, American Consumer Credit Counseling is impressively detailed with their FAQs and discussion of debt management. They offer a debt management calculator that allows potential clients to input their creditors and outstanding balances to get an idea of the savings they may realize. Established in 1991, the company does business in all 50 states and is accredited by the BBB, AICCCA, and ISO. Their fees are also low ($39 to enroll, and from $5 to $35 monthly). However, they will only deal with unsecured debt, and the site pushes the debt management plan a bit more heavily than other competitors.
For example, a person with three or four credit cards, might owe a combined $20,000 on the cards and be paying something like 24 percent interest. The credit counseling agency representing him could go to a bank and negotiate a loan at half that rate and save quite a bit of money in interest. The loan money would be used to pay off the credit cards, creating a zero balance on each card. Instead of making three or four payments every month, the person would have only one payment.
×