For most people I would say that signing up for National Debt Relief is not a good idea. While on its face, having you pay no up front fees with the goal of making you debt free in 2 to 4 years sounds great.  However the truth is there may be better options which can accomplish the same goals for a lower cost and that have less of an impact on your credit and your sanity from being sued by a debt collector.  Debt settlement in my opinion is best suited for people who have already been delinquent with their debts and have lump sums to offer up front to negotiate settlements of 50% or less in many cases.  Otherwise chapter 7 bankruptcy or chapter 13 bankruptcy may be the best fit to eliminate debt or pay off debt over a 3 to 5 year repayment plan and avoid being sued by a lawsuit.
In the United States, Credit counseling agencies are loosely regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, which can sue companies that have deceived consumers about the cost, nature, or benefits of their services.[1] Different states may regulate DMPs individually and Attorneys General are empowered to protect state citizens from fraud.[4] Two professional associations represent Credit counselors: the National Foundation for Credit Counseling and the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies.[6]
Credit card balance transfers. One of the simplest and easiest ways to lower the interest rate on credit card debt is to make credit card balance transfers. When you transfer a balance, you take advantage of a credit card offer that provides a low promotional rate for a limited period. It's common for credit cards to offer 0% interest on balance transfers for anywhere from 12 to 18 months. Balance-transfer cards sometimes charge a fee, such as 3% of the amount transferred, but there are some cards that don't impose charges, and those can be an especially good deal. 
Next, the creditor will do their own investigation, according to National Debt Relief, which means they will check on your payment behavior with other creditors. This is why the company “strongly encourages” that you stop payment to all qualified creditors if you’ve decided on a debt settlement program. If the creditor decides that you are unable to pay off your debts, they will be more inclined to settle for a reduced payment plan and accept the new terms set forth by the debt relief company.
I graduated college in 2014, spent a year in law school before realizing it wasn’t for me. Although I have a good paying job now, I didn’t realize how expensive law school really was! My credit card debt for networking and socializing was drastically higher than it was for undergrad (where I paid it off every month). I’m now confronted with this and working to pay it down (3 months in and $2,000 down!). But I’m trying to get even more so that I can start saving for a ring! I didn’t sell any of my textbooks back in college and posted them online last week. So far I’ve earned almost $600 off of them, all of which is going towards my credit card. Additionally, my security deposit from my old apartment is coming back. I don’t have my entire emergency fund built yet (about 1.5 months worth saved), so 1/3 of it is going towards that, the other 2/3 towards my debt. I should be able to pay off another $2,000 in the second half of August/first half of September.

It depends — is your credit in enough shape to qualify for a lower interest rate on a consolidation loan? Will you be able to make the monthly payment associated with the loan? Unlike a credit card, where you can pay the minimum, an installment loan locks you into a payment each month for a set period of time. You can also consider a balance-transfer credit card, which could help you save on interest. More info on the pros and cons of all those options here:


Start paying into your settlement fund. National Debt Relief asks you to make monthly payments into an escrow account that it can eventually use to pay your debt settlement costs. This monthly payment is typically lower than monthly payments on your debt. While you can stop making payments on your debt if it’s unaffordable, you’ll end up paying more in the end.

The company has an A+ rating with BBB, where there are currently more than 130 customer reviews. Of the lowest ratings, complaints are centered on National Debt Relief’s customers sales and marketing tactics. Some complaints were also about representatives not being upfront or clear about the potential negative consequences of entering a debt relief program, like your credit score plummeting. Between 2015 and 2018, 77 complaints were filed against National Debt Relief on BBB. Out of this number, 36 are marked as resolved and closed and 41 marked as answered.
Many approved credit counseling agencies provide counseling services in languages other than English. For a list of agencies and the languages that they offer, select the language from the drop down list below and click "Go". If you are looking for a language that is not found on the drop down list, please contact the Credit Counseling Unit at the Executive Office for U.S. Trustees at ust.cc.help@usdoj.gov.
Hello i am 29 i have 3 credit cards all with a balance totaling about $28k. I have had the cards long term and never missed a payment or late on a payment the interest is the lowest they offer at 12.9%. I always make at least the minimum payment, mostly double or even more but it seems they are taking forever to pay off. Talked to a debt settlement company’ which seemed very high pressure into getting me to sign up with them assuring me this was the best route sounded to good to be true so i decided now to go with them. Also spoke with a credit counselling society, they offered to put me in a debt management program which would bring all the cards down to 0% interest and have them all payed off with one monthly payment in 5 years. My concern with this is I would not be able to purchase a home or finance anything for a long time. I have good credit just high debt ratio also have a mortgage for 4 years in good standing and many car loans paid off through the years. What do you think my best option is to pay down this unsecured debt faster and be debt free? Applied for a debt consolidation loan through my bank was not approved because my income was to low last year (self-employed) and cannot borrow from my home equity because they changed the mortgage rules here in BC this year.
Getting out of debt goes beyond making monthly payments, it takes discipline and self-control to avoid taking on new debt. Stop using a credit card to fund your lifestyle. Make a conscious decision to stop borrowing money, whether it be from a credit line or credit cards. By putting a stop to borrowing money you don’t have, you can focus solely on your existing debt and avoid any new debt from forming.
Always keep in mind when dealing with services like debt relief that many customer view it as a magic pill to solve all their debt problems and make them financially stable, which is not the case. There are no guarantees when it comes to debt relief. These companies try to work with customers to lower their debt burden, but they aren’t going to work miracles.

Experian, one of the three major credit bureau companies in the U.S., said the impact on your score should be minimal if you and the agency making payments for you, are on-time every month. If lenders look at your full credit report while you are in a DMP, they will see that you are repaying the debt at a reduced rate and it may affect their final decision on whether to grant you a loan.
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