The creditors don’t have the time or manpower to negotiate with every one of their customers individually. They work with credit counseling agencies like us to create a set of standard concessions that we may offer to clients when appropriate. The creditors also understand that we provide counseling and education, which makes our clients more likely to succeed in repaying their debts.
Debt forgiveness is another potential strategy for anyone ready to admit "I need help with my debt." This involves paying your creditors a lump sum payment that is less than what you owe and ask them to wipe out your debt. While this is sometimes effective, it can also backfire and add even more debt to your totals. While ACCC does not get involved in debt forgiveness plans, we can help you understand the benefits or potential risks this approach may pose.
This is a form of assisted debt consolidation that works extremely well if you have a large volume of debt and a less-than-perfect credit score. You enroll in a program through a credit counseling agency, who works out a payment plan that works for your budget. Then they negotiate with your creditors on your behalf to reduce your interest rates. Total monthly payments are typically reduced by 30-50% and most people complete the program within 60 payments or less.
A credit counselor is a professional who can advise you on how to handle and successfully pay off your debt. A simple call to a credit counseling agency for a consultation won’t impact your credit in the slightest. But if the credit counselor or agency enrolls you in any kind of consolidation, repayment, or management plan, that could affect your credit.
There are many ways to get out of credit card as well as medical debt or to get help with loans. Find a list of solutions below. You can consolidate it, enter into debt reduction or credit card hardship programs, reduce the interest rates on any loans or even completely eliminate it. Most lenders are willing to offer some form of assistance to borrowers, and non-profit agencies can also assist. Various options, including some that are free, are available to help consumers reduce the amount of debt that they have.
In addition I had inform them that I was closing the checking account that they had been taking the payments from so they were not to charge that account going forward. That I wouod get back to them with the new information for my new checking account. I purposely had not given them the information because I was researching what my recourse was so when it came time for the payment I hadn’t given the information and on their website it’s it’s showing that I owe them money for fees and they wanted their money so what did they do they charged my old account which had nothing in it so I was hit with a NSF fees and every 3 days I get charged a fee for the negative balance but they got their payment and I’ve got payment it went to fees for the accounts that they lost the settlement because couldn’t make payments to my creditors Beach they had drained my account for all the fees
Customer Service: Exceptional customer service that is available every day of the week is another benefit to working with Freedom Debt Relief. Many other debt relief companies only operate Monday through Friday, but Freedom Debt Relief also has Saturday and Sunday hours that run into the evenings. You can contact them by phone or email, whichever works best for you.
I am currently with this company and I must say their success rate is so high because they automatically drop any account that they can not resolve leaving you at square one. If you find yourself needing to use this company or companies like this do yourself a favor and just work with your creditor directly. You will save money and to my surprise my creditor’s attorney was more willing to work with me directly than with this company.
How it works: Whether it’s at a bank, credit union office or online, the consumer must fill out an application and be approved for a loan. Your income and expenses are part of the decision, but credit score is usually the deciding factor. If approved, you receive a fixed-rate loan and use it to pay off your credit card balances. You then make a fixed monthly payment to the lender to pay off your loan.

Debt management and debt settlement are two very different repayment options. A debt management plan provides regular monthly payments to your creditors. In contrast, a debt settlement program often encourages you to stop sending payments to creditors, which can result in serious consequences. The risks associated with debt settlement programs are important to understand. Below is a summary of things you should consider before choosing debt settlement as an option.
Credit counseling works because it provides people with the time and tools to focus on their financial situation. The nonprofit version of this service provides a holistic, high-level view of an individual or family’s debts, assets, income and expenses before recommending a debt relief strategy. These services work because the solutions provided are personalized and specific, and because counselors are well-trained and non-biased.
You cannot use your existing credit cards while you’re on a debt management plan, nor can you open new accounts. McClary also said that if you do manage to open new credit card accounts during your debt management plan, existing creditors who find out may stop participating in your debt management plan and reset your account to its original terms and interest rate.
National Debt Relief is a debt settlement service. For a fee, it will negotiate with your creditors to reduce the amount of debt you owe. It’s among the most recognized debt settlement services in the country, with high rankings from the BBB and Trustpilot reviewers. It’s also accredited with top industry associations, including the American Fair Credit Council (AFCC).

It’s hard at first, because most of us aren’t used to doing that. (Especially if we’re living on a low income.) But it’s absolutely doable, and gets easier with practice. And once you start paying stuff off, it becomes even easier because your money isn’t flying out the door to service debt. You have MORE money available, which makes things easier still. It’s the exact opposite of a vicious circle.


At American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC), we offer free credit counseling and low-cost services to consumers who are ready to say "I need help with my debt." Our highly trained and certified credit counselors can clear up any confusion around your finances, help you evaluate your financial situation, and go over all of the options for paying down your debt — from debt relief loans to debt settlement programs and debt management plans. We'll help you choose the avenue that will work best for your situation and goals, and provide you with ample educational materials to help you manage your money more effectively.
Debt consolidation loans are a well-known, well-advertised option for consumers who struggle with debt. These credit facilities exist for the express purpose of paying off outstanding unsecured debts and do their job quite well. When you take out a debt consolidation loan, your lender immediately pays off your existing creditors and starts billing you for the balance.
Chapter 13 is a three- or five-year court-approved repayment plan, based on your income and debts. If you are able to stick with the plan for its full term, the remaining unsecured debt is discharged. It will take longer than a Chapter 7 — but if you are able to keep up with payments (a majority of people are not), you will get to keep your property. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy stays on your credit report for seven years from the filing date.
I am 37 and have amassed $45,000 in credit card debt (over three cards). I have student loans, a mortgage loan, and an equity line of credit. I have never been late with any payments. However, I am a bit stressed with the high credit card debt. Would it be wise to file for chapter 7 on the credit card debt only while keeping my mortgage, equity line of credit, and student loan payments?
Avoid outrageous upfront fees. A small initial fee (up to $50 or, in rare cases, as much as $100 if you have a lot of debt or high income) is normal, but large upfront fees are out of line. If any agency asks for a fee (or donation) make sure that you know what it will cover, and get it in writing. Find out if you'll have to pay any additional fees to start the program. Don't get tricked into paying one "consultation fee," and then an "application fee" or "an enrollment fee." If you're truly unable to pay, look for an agency that is willing to waive the fee or spread it out (without charging additional fees for doing so).
We typically recommend fixing the rate as much as possible, unless you know that you can pay off your debt during a short time period. If you think it will take you 20 years to pay off your loan, you don’t want to bet on the next 20 years of interest rates. But, if you think you will pay it off in five years, you may want to take the bet. Some providers with variable rates will cap them, which can help temper some of the risk.
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Get the answers to the most common questions on credit card bill and debt consolidation. This can be one solution to use, especially when the interest rates are lower. The process can help you decide whether taking the approach of credit card consolidation is right for you as just maybe it can help you in your personal and financial situation. Find a list of questions about credit card consolidation.
On average, National Debt Relief can reduce enrolled debt by around 49 percent which is slightly higher than Freedom and New Era. You will pay fees of between 15 to 25 percent on the amount that is settled. This debt relief company doesn’t charge any upfront fees, so you’ll only pay on the debts that are settled. Keep in mind, though, that the fees are in addition to the settlement, so a 20 percent fee in addition to a 49 percent settlement ends up being 69 percent of the original amount.
I have read many blog posts, but this one seemed to spark something in me and re-motivate me to pay off my debt. I know that I am not alone in this, but I can do this on my own. I’m ready to refresh my system of repayment, earn more cash, and limit my spending activities. With Christmas around the corner, it’s hard not to push getting seriously about paying off debt until the new year, but I know if I can manage it now, I can do it all year. And that’s one less month I’ll be in debt.
When it comes to paying off credit card debt, many consumers take the path of least resistance: the so-called "minimum payment plan." By law, credit card issuers are required to set a minimum monthly payment amount for each cardholder. These payments are calculated on the basis of the cardholder's total balance, interest rate and certain other factors.
To get out of debt quickly, you have to look closely at your assets. Real estate assets that are expensive to maintain, life insurance policies that are no longer necessary but have expensive premiums and investments with returns lower than the interest rate on debt should all be converted into cash right away. Be aware of the tax implications of liquidating assets. Typically, proceeds from a life settlement and money from the sale of a primary home aren’t taxable. Check with a certified public accountant before making any big moves.
Who’s it best for? If you can’t part with your smartphone, InCharge has a mobile app that lets you manage your account on the go. You can add creditors, change payment due dates, and even see whether creditors have accepted proposals regarding reduced monthly payments or interest rates. They even have a fully online credit counseling option if you prefer that over phone or in-person counseling.
Look for a nonprofit credit counseling organization that belongs to either the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) or the Financial Counseling Association of America (FCAA). They ensure member agencies pass rigorous standards set forth by the Council on Accreditation or another approved third party, and that their counselors pass a comprehensive certification program. Even if they are members of such organizations, though, be picky.
They start by reviewing your income, expenses and credit score to determine whether how creditworthy you are. Your credit score is the key number in that equation. The higher, the better. Anything above 700 and you should get an affordable interest rate on your loan. Anything below that and you will pay a much higher interest rate or possibly not qualify for a loan at all if your score has dipped below 620.
Understand the basics of good credit counseling. Many nonprofit credit counseling agencies offer both free and paid services, Kalkowski says. They may offer complimentary consultations, financial literacy workshops or even one-on-one budgeting sessions free of charge. However, if you sign up for a debt management plan, expect to pay for the service. Debt management plans through nonprofits often have a startup fee of $30 to $40 and monthly fees of $20 to $40.

Hi. We have about $45k in debt , 10 of which is a trailer loan. Daughter is in first year of college. If I decide to see a credit counselor would it hurt her chances of getting fafsa ??? Loans in her name I believe because she is over 18, but we don’t want her owing a lot just coming out of college either, and we have a son graduating in a year as well. This has stressed me out to even thinking of claiming bankruptcy but I’m not going to go to that extreme…..help!! Suggestions? Owe $300k on house, own all cars.

Hello i am 29 i have 3 credit cards all with a balance totaling about $28k. I have had the cards long term and never missed a payment or late on a payment the interest is the lowest they offer at 12.9%. I always make at least the minimum payment, mostly double or even more but it seems they are taking forever to pay off. Talked to a debt settlement company’ which seemed very high pressure into getting me to sign up with them assuring me this was the best route sounded to good to be true so i decided now to go with them. Also spoke with a credit counselling society, they offered to put me in a debt management program which would bring all the cards down to 0% interest and have them all payed off with one monthly payment in 5 years. My concern with this is I would not be able to purchase a home or finance anything for a long time. I have good credit just high debt ratio also have a mortgage for 4 years in good standing and many car loans paid off through the years. What do you think my best option is to pay down this unsecured debt faster and be debt free? Applied for a debt consolidation loan through my bank was not approved because my income was to low last year (self-employed) and cannot borrow from my home equity because they changed the mortgage rules here in BC this year.

I have recently cut everything up and transferred my high interest cc to my lowest int credit card. I’m not able to use any of them anymore. I have $2k in savings at a seperate bank. I am married with no children but I still worry that $2k isn’t enough. My DTI was .88 based on your system. Very depressing but helpful. I’m going to try something drastic and get rid of about $68k in debt on what is currently $71,500 of annual income by the time i’m 30. That gives me almost 3 years. Don’t know why but I feel like writing that actually helped me. Thanks again. I really enjoy the site and this post! Hopefully in 3 years or less i’ll write in with a success story!

A credit counselor also may be able to negotiate lower interest rates with your creditors and get late payment fees and other fees waived, which will help to lower your monthly payment amount. Because of the lower interest rate, more of your monthly payment will be applied to your outstanding balance, and this will help to speed along your repayment. For example, one agency reported that clients reduced their monthly interest payments by an average of $209.81, and their total monthly payments went down an average of $172.48 each month. (Cambridge Credit Counseling Transparency Report #8).
Generally my view is if you can afford to pay your debt through a DMP, go for it. But if the payment plan they are proposing is a stretch and you’re not sure that you can keep up with those monthly payments, then consider settlement or bankruptcy. Of course, it’s impossible for me to say exactly what you should do since I don’t know your entire financial situation, but I wouldn’t rule it out for fear of the impact on your credit.

A debt collector generally is a person or company that regularly collects debts owed to others, usually when those debts are past-due. This includes collection agencies, lawyers who collect debts as part of their business, and companies that buy delinquent debts and then try to collect them. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) prohibits debt collectors from using abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices to collect from you.
How it works: Settlement companies ask you to stop paying the credit card companies and instead, send regular payments to an escrow account. When the balance in that account has reached a sufficient level, the settlement company negotiates with the card company for a reduced, lump-sum payment. If the creditor agrees, money is sent from the escrow account. If there is not enough money in the account, a payment schedule is agreed upon.

Within five days after a debt collector first contacts you, the collector must send you a written notice that tells you the name of the creditor, how much you owe, and what action to take if you believe you do not owe the money. If you owe the money or part of it, contact the creditor to arrange for payment. If you believe you do not owe the money, contact the creditor in writing and send a copy to the collection agency informing them with a letter not to contact you.
Credit counseling provides guidance and support on consumer credit, money and debt management, and budgeting. The objective of most credit counseling is to help a debtor avoid bankruptcy and to provide primary financial education on managing money. Borrowers with an understanding of money management are assets for lenders as well. Many counseling services also negotiate with creditors on behalf of the borrower to reduce interest rates and late fees.
A credit counselor is a professional who can advise you on how to handle and successfully pay off your debt. A simple call to a credit counseling agency for a consultation won’t impact your credit in the slightest. But if the credit counselor or agency enrolls you in any kind of consolidation, repayment, or management plan, that could affect your credit.

One of the most effective ways to budget to eliminate debt is using the cash envelope system. This is where you place a predetermined amount of money in different envelopes labeled with different spending categories. Anytime you spend within a category, the money must come from the corresponding envelope. When the money is out, it’s all out, and you can’t overspend.
They say you can opt out at anytime. After 2 years of payments and in between any ongoing negotiations I sent a written statement to opt out. They called me to verify which I answered, then put me on hold several times for 5 to 10 minutes each time and then said my supervisor would like to speak with you. I hung up frustrated and since then they blow up my phone daily with phone calls!!! I opted out, leave me alone!
If you're seeking credit card relief, ACCC’s debt management program can help. A debt management program provides a unique way of eliminating credit card debt and is individually designed to meet your specific financial situation. If you are looking for to consolidate your debts, you may find relief through ACCC's debt management program. Our professionally trained and independently certified counselors will:
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