Credit score is not a factor with credit counseling. The initial consultation, even with a credit check, won’t affect your score. There is no minimum score requirement to enroll in a debt management program. In addition, when done correctly the program has either a neutral or positive effect on your credit. In other words, if you still have good or excellent credit, this program won’t set you back.
Credit Score Issues: One thing is certain: your credit score will be damaged. The lender, collector or credit-card company will report the debt as “settled for less than agreed’’ or “settlement accepted’’ for seven years. Also, even though you are dealing with the debt-settlement company for payments, the lenders will report late-payment status updates to the credit bureaus. That could be the case until the account is actually settled.
credit counseling agency for a consultation doesn’t impact your credit at all since the fact that you’ve sought help is not reported to the credit reporting agency. If you enroll you in a Debt Management Plan, where you make one monthly payment to the counseling agency and it disburses payments to your creditors, however, it can affect your credit in several ways.
Try to put some money down on your higher interest student loans. The way I paid off my bachelor loans was whenever i got a refund back from the college or from taxes a portion of that went to the student loans. The more you tackle your higher interest loans the better your credit. Now if you have like tiny ones like 1,000 try paying those off if your not financially ready to tackle the bigger interest rates ones.
Whether you’re carrying credit card debt, personal loans, or student loans, one of the best ways to pay them down sooner is to make more than the minimum monthly payment. Doing so will not only help you save on interest throughout the life of your loan, but it will also speed up the payoff process. To avoid any headaches, make sure your loan doesn’t charge any prepayment penalties before you get started.
Making extra payments should allow more money to come off the principal -- so next month, you'd pay interest on a smaller principal balance and your interest cost would be lower. That's why paying extra can be so helpful in becoming debt free. Not only do you reduce the remaining balance owed, but you also reduce the interest cost that causes your balance to grow. 
Debt forgiveness is another potential strategy for anyone ready to admit "I need help with my debt." This involves paying your creditors a lump sum payment that is less than what you owe and ask them to wipe out your debt. While this is sometimes effective, it can also backfire and add even more debt to your totals. While ACCC does not get involved in debt forgiveness plans, we can help you understand the benefits or potential risks this approach may pose.
Reading the complaints, now I see it wasn’t me, because sometimes. I expect more from a company, but what really upset me ,was this person who answered the phone and he pretty much said you handle that .We only have limited power of attorney. I was trying to explain the problem, but all he kept saying was “ DID I ANSWER ALL YOUR Concerns! I said yes because I knew he didn’t hear a word I said , and could give a crap less.
Who’s it best for? Anyone who doesn’t like surprises will appreciate Cambridge. The clear FAQs include questions any prospective client would want answered (for example: “How will the program affect my credit rating?”) and there are a lot of financial basics, including budget worksheets and a debt payoff calculator. Cambridge is also willing to work with limited kinds of secured debt.

McClary advises following the 50-20-30 rule of budgeting: Allocate up to 50 percent of your budget to fixed expenses like mortgage, rent and car payments; 20 percent to savings; and 30 percent to variable expenses, especially discretionary spending for things like hobbies, recreation and dining out. That 30 percent zone is the first area to target for cutting back, McClary says.
ClearPoint Credit Counseling has been in business for 50 years, and their wide range of educational offerings includes “ClearPoint U,” a series of free, on-demand online courses on personal finance topics. The company has 50 branches across the U.S. and is accredited by the BBB, NFCC, and COA. Their website is polished and easy to navigate, but is a bit less transparent about fees and potential reductions in interest rates than their competitors.
The content on this page provides general consumer information. It is not legal advice or regulatory guidance. The CFPB updates this information periodically. This information may include links or references to third-party resources or content. We do not endorse the third-party or guarantee the accuracy of this third-party information. There may be other resources that also serve your needs.
When you start a debt management program, you’re adjusting the payment schedule for your credit cards. So it’s important to note that your creditors may report that you’ve missed a payment on your credit reports in the first month your plan starts. Basically, this happens because there can be a gap between when a payment was supposed to be made on your previous payment schedule and the payments you’re making now.
First, it can be difficult to complete a debt management program. You’ll lose a large measure of financial freedom — most programs will require you to close all of your credit accounts and refrain from opening new ones. You may be allowed to keep one creditor outside of your debt management plan for emergencies, but if you abuse the privilege, you’ll just dig a deeper hole of debt.

Bill “No Pay” Fay has lived a meager financial existence his entire life. He started writing/bragging about it seven years ago, helping birth Debt.org into existence as the site’s original “Frugal Man.” Prior to that, he spent more than 30 years covering college and professional sports, which are the fantasy worlds of finance. His work has been published by the Associated Press, New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Sports Illustrated and Sporting News, among others. His interest in sports has waned some, but his interest in never reaching for his wallet is as passionate as ever. Bill can be reached at bfay@debt.org.
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