For example, a person with three or four credit cards, might owe a combined $20,000 on the cards and be paying something like 24 percent interest. The credit counseling agency representing him could go to a bank and negotiate a loan at half that rate and save quite a bit of money in interest. The loan money would be used to pay off the credit cards, creating a zero balance on each card. Instead of making three or four payments every month, the person would have only one payment.

The Chase Slate card, on the other hand, doesn’t charge a balance transfer fee for the first 60 days. Further, the card offers a 0% introductory APR on balance transfers and purchases for the first 15 months. If you have a credit card balance you could feasibly pay off during that time frame, transferring the balance to a 0% introductory APR card like this one could save you money on interest while simultaneously helping you pay down debt faster.
But debt consolidation is not for everyone. If you have a lot of debt, you may not be able to secure the low debt consolidation rates that this approach depends on. And consolidating debt doesn't necessarily help you reduce it — consumers taking out consolidation loans often find their debt remains the same or actually increases over a period of a couple years. Your ACCC credit counselor can help you decide if debt consolidation makes sense for you.
Using your home and your equity to secure a consolidation loan can be one of the quickest and safest ways to eliminate high interest debt. By using your home for collateral, you can greatly improve your chances of acquiring a low interest loan, and you also can borrow more than you would be able to through a personal loan. There are important differences to understand between second mortgages, refinances, and home equity loans, so please read our guide, browse our articles, and use our solution finder to receive your quote.
I have recently cut everything up and transferred my high interest cc to my lowest int credit card. I’m not able to use any of them anymore. I have $2k in savings at a seperate bank. I am married with no children but I still worry that $2k isn’t enough. My DTI was .88 based on your system. Very depressing but helpful. I’m going to try something drastic and get rid of about $68k in debt on what is currently $71,500 of annual income by the time i’m 30. That gives me almost 3 years. Don’t know why but I feel like writing that actually helped me. Thanks again. I really enjoy the site and this post! Hopefully in 3 years or less i’ll write in with a success story!
Under a DMP plan, the consumer deposits money each month into an account within the credit counseling organization. The organization then uses the funds to pay the unsecured debt, such as credit card bills, student loans, and medical bills. Paying off of debt follows a payment schedule the counselor and consumer develops. Often creditors will need to agree to the scheduled repayment plan. Creditors may decide to lower interest rates or waive fees. A successful DMP requires regular, timely payments. It may take 48 months or more to complete a debt management plan.

As for your options, it doesn’t sound like your mortgage lender is interested in working with you. (I have no idea what “new laws” they are talking about but the last time I heard, Congress passes laws and the President can either sign or veto them!) I’d recommend you read my series: Underwater On Your Home? Your Six Options and then get some professional advice. In particular, you may want to look into whether bankruptcy or a short sale can help you.
A debt management plan sets up a payment schedule for you to repay your debts, with the goal of helping creditors receive the money owed to them and ultimately improving your financial and credit standing. By voluntary agreement, you deposit funds with your credit counseling agency each month, who sends those funds directly to your creditors. It usually takes 3-5 years to complete payments under a debt management program, after which you may be able to reestablish credit.
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