Take steps to rebuild your credit and improve your credit score, which in turn, could give you access to more credit in the future. For starters, focus on implementing a plan for paying off debt, and work to keep your balances low on credit cards. Keep in mind that improving your credit score requires small, responsible actions over time, so be patient and set long-term objectives. For more tips on how to improve your FICO score, take a look here.
We do not have a minimum debt requirement for the debt management program. Our goal is to create a payment plan that is affordable and enables you to pay off your debt within a three to five year period. Our clients have, on average, credit card debt of $15,000. Though we have enrolled clients with as little as $1000 in debt, and more than $100,000 in debt. Our clients have an average annual income of $36,000.
Do yourself a favor, if you were ripped off like me by National Debt Relief, submit a complaint to ConsumerFinance.Gov. My lawyer counseled me on this. When I called from my job, they did not disclose they were a for profit agency, I had to ask them. They did not tell me the percentage that they would take as profit. I did not learn that until about 3 weeks ago when I demanded to know the profit they took. Their answer after a long time of questioning was they took 25% off the original debt for themselves. When I said that I did not know this. Their response was : “it is in page 3 of the contract.” I could not find this information anywhere nor it was said to me. The representative who enrolled me Berlinda C only said ” We take a small fee” but would not specify the amount. So far, they have taken from me $2,500 and my creditors have hardly seen any money. When a settlement is negotiated, they take everything they have taken from my account for themselves and on top of that charge about $60 monthly extra in order to make the payments to the creditors. I find this sum exorbitant. I now closed my account with them because I have realized the rip off that this company is. I have lost $2,500 for their profit.
Make sure you are working with an NFCC-member nonprofit credit counseling agency like InCharge Debt Solutions. Nonprofit credit counselors provide impartial financial advice that has your best interest in mind. A nonprofit debt management program will have low fees and work to secure interest rate reductions on your credit card debt, so that you are able to pay off your debt by making consistent affordable payments.
I have been with National Debt Relief Service and thought I would save 40% to 50% of my debt. but, so far, with 23% customer fees among others, the 7 I have settled for $7333.64 out of $10,388 with their fees came to a net savings of less than $3055. The fees are very high and now that I am signed up, I cannot leave since they say the creditors would not honor the settlement amounts.
In the United States, credit counseling agencies are loosely regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation's consumer protection agency, which can sue companies that have deceived consumers about the cost, nature, or benefits of their services.[1] Different states may regulate DMPs individually and attorneys general are empowered to protect state citizens from fraud.[5]
On the plus side, if you pay off a card balance that’s close to the credit limit, you may improve your “utilization ratio”—the ratio that compares your credit limits with the balances you currently have—provided you leave the card open after paying it off. But simply moving balances from one card to another is unlikely to do a whole lot for your scores.
You'd make the minimum payments on all debts, and pay as much extra as possible toward the $1,000 credit card balance. Once that was paid off, the new "minimum" payment for the card with the $3,000 balance would be $400 (the original $300 minimum plus the $100 minimum you used to make on the card you paid off). Extra cash would also go to repay that card. Finally, once both of those were paid off, you'd focus all your attention on the personal loan. The new "minimum" payment would be $650 ($300 + $250 + $100). 
Ok, so what if I DID max out all my credit cards and couldn’t get another loan? I’d have piles of debt, with little or nothing to show for all my hard work, and payments like crazy. In short, I’d be desperate, but…I’d find another way to solve the immediate problem facing me. So why not just find another way NOW and save myself a world of hurt and a pile of debt…
Such a scam, they make you believe they’re helping you but in reality they are ripping you off. They are charging you for something you can do on your own. There is nothing special about this company, please don’t waste your time and money. Wish someone told me this before I signed up. I never write reviews but I feel so strongly about this that I had to try to stop someone else from making the same mistake and sign up with National Debt Relief.
There are two ways to file for bankruptcy – a chapter 7 and a chapter 13. The difference is that a chapter 7 bankruptcy is called a liquidation bankruptcy as its goal is to liquidate your assets to repay your creditors. However, much of your assets such as your house, automobile, furniture and personal items are excluded in a chapter 7 bankruptcy so in practice you might not have any assets that could be liquidated.

Settlement has big risks, though, including steep fees (15% to 20% of what the company is able to save you is typical). You may also sustain damage to your credit score and receive harassing calls from creditors while you’re saving up for the program. You’ll also have to pay taxes on forgiven debt. Most debt settlement companies are for-profit companies, while most debt management companies are nonprofits.


Over time, bankruptcy might come back to bite you in unexpected ways. If your employer requires you to carry a security clearance, there's a chance that it could be rescinded. If you're applying for a mortgage or rental property, your brush with insolvency could disqualify you from consideration. Depending on your area of expertise, you might even find it difficult to find or keep a job.
Another obstacle that trip up so many is thinking you'll make progress on debt repayment by making your minimum payments. Yes, it minimizes inconvenience and will seem easier than other strategies, but it's costly. Imagine, for example, you owe $20,000 on your credit card(s) and that you're being charged a 25% interest rate. If your minimum payments are 3% of your balance, you'll be starting out paying a whopping $600 per month, meaning you'll have to come up with $150 per week. If you can't, your balance will be growing, digging you deeper in debt. In that situation, it can take more than 30 years to pay the debt off, with your total payments exceeding $63,000 -- all for a $20,000 balance owed.
If you’re not sure where to start, track your spending for at least a day to see if you’re getting enough value from the things you buy. Just write it down as you spend and see how you feel. You’ll probably be amazed that you begin making changes immediately, cutting out the things that don’t really matter to you and getting more of the things that do instead.
There are many ways to get out of credit card as well as medical debt or to get help with loans. Find a list of solutions below. You can consolidate it, enter into debt reduction or credit card hardship programs, reduce the interest rates on any loans or even completely eliminate it. Most lenders are willing to offer some form of assistance to borrowers, and non-profit agencies can also assist. Various options, including some that are free, are available to help consumers reduce the amount of debt that they have.
Best Answer:  That National Debt Relief is a Scam! But they are slick in the way that they operate and know tricks to cover up their dirt so it's hard to prove. A friend of mine signed up for their debt settlement program about 7 months ago and they screwed her over so much in fees and ruined her credit in the process that it sent her into a great depression. I knew they were up to no good because they kept relentlessly pursuing her to sign up with their scam program just like you described. I wouldn't trust this National Debt Relief with a 10 foot pole no matter how they look on the surface..they are nothing but some crooks preying on people who are already struggling! WARNING: I did a search and even found how they could be operating under different names (see source). I been around a long time and am aware of companies like this that keep changing their names, locations, and phone numbers to cover up their dirt and then keep coming back under a clean slate with clean BBB record, and more fake testimonials and all to just repeat the process, keep duping the public, and making tons of money . This makes me sick to my stomach! I sure hope the FTC and other authorities will continue to pursue and put a stop to these scams - no matter slick these crooks operate the people are getting wiser & wiser everyday not to fall for these scams. I commend you for being smart enough to ask around on this matter. Also you can check with your creditors and usuallly they will be willing to work with you if you come at them honestly and sincerely. This is what I did years ago -on my own- to settle my debt and my creditors reduced my payment and debt amount until it was cleared. Remember: If you are behind on your debt, creditors will usually like to get paid something rather than nothing at all - so this makes them highly motivated to work with you.

Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.
Some of these debt reductions solutions as well as assistance programs are offered by credit card issuers, private companies, non-profit counselors, banks and other organizations. Banks, medical providers, credit card companies as well as other lenders are more willing than ever to help a household get their finances under control. They would rather be able to collect some of the outstanding debt from the borrower rather than see them file bankruptcy or somehow contest it, in which case the lender gets nothing.
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The company is clear about average fees ($40 for setup and $25 monthly, not to exceed $75 and $50, respectively) as well as average interest-rate and payment reductions on its website. They also publish detailed “transparency reports” that include debt management dropout rates, savings rates, and client satisfaction rates tracked over several years.
When you have a small emergency fund, you won't have to reach for your credit cards when disaster strikes. You can use the saved money and not slide back into debt. Of course, when you use the money in your emergency fund, you may need to pause debt payment to rebuild it again. But at least you won't have gone deeper into debt when trying to climb out of the hole. 
Much of what debt management companies do involves simply contacting your creditors and negotiating alternative repayment plans, hopefully with reduced interest rates and fees. If you are struggling to make payments, you can usually do this yourself. Most creditors will be eager to help you meet your debt obligations because they want to help you avoid bankruptcy, which sucks for them. Talking to your creditors directly isn’t pleasant, and it may not be easy, but it can be done.
This should really only be explored a last resort for debt relief before you file for bankruptcy. If you’ve tried everything else and haven’t had any success, then you can consider a debt settlement plan where you settle your debts for less than the full amount owed. This can cause significant damage to your credit score and results may vary, but it may be your best option if your situation is truly critical.
They charge you 18% of all the debt you enroll with them as a fee which means if you owe 15k in debt, you pay them $2700 in fees. But the catch is you pay nothing up front. Your money goes into a savings account monthly but once your first debt is settled, they collect that entire fee from your dedicate savings account. So you then have minimal saved cash available for the next debt that you owe to be settled. So that debt can end up going to a law firm and you get sued.
If you negotiate a payment plan or a settlement offer, get it in writing. And don't give creditors access to your bank account, as this could make it easier for them to get a court order to freeze your bank account or to put a lien on it -- and unscrupulous collectors could take out more money than you give permission for. Instead, send payments in the mail. 
If you’re struggling with finding the best way to get out of debt, my advice is this: Don’t waste your time reading arguments all over the internet. Just pick the one that resonates with you and get going. Most of the people who berate others for not paying off debt in the “right” order or way have never even been in debt themselves — let alone gotten OUT. Don’t listen to people who purport to know what’s best for you when they’ve never been in a remotely similar situation. You know your life best.
Learn about other types of assistance programs from credit card companies. While it is true that many are increasing fees and in general turning up the pressure on credit card holders, there are also an increasing number of companies that are creating assistance programs to take a more pro-active approach in an effort to truly help people. They are more willing to reduce and cancel unpaid debt, reduce interest rates, allow payment plans, and offer other assistance.
Peer to peer lending low interest loans can be helpful in some cases. This is a fairly new business, but a number of peer to peer lending sites may offer help, such as Prosper, Lending Club, and Zopa. The money can often be used for paying any number of bills or handle various forms of arrears. These companies and their services can help you reduce, consolidate and pay off credit cards, automobile loans, medical bills, and other higher interest rate loans. While they do often have minimum credit scores needed (especially when consolidating debt) They can be an option. More on peer to peer loans.
Over time, your small balances should disappear one by one, freeing up more dollars to throw at your larger debts and loans. This “snowball effect” allows you to pay down smaller balances first — logging a few “wins” for the psychological effect — while letting you save the largest loans for last. Ultimately, the goal is snowballing all of your extra dollars toward your debts until they’re demolished — and you’re finally debt-free.
If a consumer’s financial problems resulted from too much debt or inability to repay their debts, a credit counseling agency might recommend enrollment in a debt management plan (DMP). A certified credit counselor will review a consumer's overall financial situation and offer customized money management advice. This advice may include a DMP designed for the client's unique circumstances. 
Throughout all the years I carried this debt around with me, I never wanted to be in debt. But it wasn’t until I met the three criteria above that I was able to do something about it. First, I had to stop living in denial, telling myself my debt “wasn’t that bad.” I needed a reality check and to stare down exactly how much debt I had and what it would take to get out.

Under the provisions of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), you may qualify for a reduced interest rate on mortgage payments or credit card debt, protection from eviction, or a delay of all civil court actions, such as bankruptcy, foreclosure, or divorce proceedings. To find out if you qualify, contact your local Armed Forces Legal Assistance office.
Discipline yourself to make regular payments on your debts, prioritizing your smallest debt to make early wins in eliminating debts. Automate those debt payments, so it doesn’t just rely on discipline. Discipline will fail you sooner or later, so the more you can automate “good financial behaviors” like paying down debts and saving money, the more likely you are to sustain them.
Experian, one of the three major credit bureau companies in the U.S., said the impact on your score should be minimal if you and the agency making payments for you, are on-time every month. If lenders look at your full credit report while you are in a DMP, they will see that you are repaying the debt at a reduced rate and it may affect their final decision on whether to grant you a loan.
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