Talk with your credit card company, even if you have been turned down before. Rather than pay a company to talk to your creditor on your behalf, remember that you can do it yourself for free. You can find the telephone number on your card or your statement. Be persistent and polite. Keep good records of your debts, so that when you reach the credit card company, you can explain your situation. Your goal is to work out a modified payment plan that reduces your payments to a level you can manage.
To answer your question, though, how defaulting on season tickets would impact your credit would depend on whether or not the organization/team reports the incident/account to the credit reporting agencies. If they report the incident as a collection it will have a negative impact on credit standing and hurt your credit score. It won’t impact current accounts but if the impact is significant and your credit score takes a severe hit, it could impact future loans, their interest rates and your ability to qualify for them.
National Debt Relife did nothing but lie and scam me. I asked to leave the program so that I could got to another company. I still had a refund due to me so I submitted the request. I have documentation that states when my refund of $2439.40 will come to my bank which is 9/13/2018. As of today I have not received my refund and the company is holding it so that I am charged more fees. Please help, I have already paid late fees and penalties because of this. I am speaking with an attorney now so that I can recover damages caused by the not returning my funds in the mannar promised.Read More
A DMP is a payment plan that helps you repay your debts. Under the plan, you deposit funds with us each month, which we disburse to your creditors. We also handle calls from your creditors to ensure everything is going smoothly. The vast majority of our payment processing is electronic, so funds are transferred directly to the creditors without delay. Creditors may also offer to reduce or waive fees, finances charges, or interest rates to help lower your DMP payments and ensure your success on the plan. Learn More

I started today while reading this article by putting 5 dollars into my savings account. I feel like I’m drowning in debt and living from emergency to emergency. I know they key for me to getting out is establishing savings…and I’ve procrastinated. No more! Today I started, next pay check I’ll put in 50, next 100, maybe I’ll get to 200 in a few months. I want to see $2000 in there so I can afford things like car maintenance and medical co-pays!
Went with National Debt Relief. One of my creditors Capital One decided to take me to court and sue me for $8880. Balance at my last payment was $7911. I borrowed $3500 and deposited it in my bank account at National Debt Relief hoping they could reach an agreement and avoid court. I was due in court on Monday. The Friday before court they notified me they had a verbal agreement with Capital One. I was required to take the agreement to court on Monday and have the Capital One Lawyer agree to it and the Judge to sign off and dismiss the case. The agreement was sighed by all parties. National Debt still charged me the full amount of there fees 22%. The agreement was for 70 Cents on the... Read More
Under the provisions of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), you may qualify for a reduced interest rate on mortgage payments or credit card debt, protection from eviction, or a delay of all civil court actions, such as bankruptcy, foreclosure, or divorce proceedings. To find out if you qualify, contact your local Armed Forces Legal Assistance office.
No. All eligible unsecured debt must be accounted for in a debt management plan, even those bills that you typically have no problem making payments on. The credit counseling agency in charge of your debt payment plan will want a full accounting of income and expenses in order to arrive at an accurate amount available to make the monthly DMP payments so be prepared to include all eligible debts.
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